Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Nonprofit Facebook page templates: What you need to know

If your organization’s Facebook page is categorized as a “non profit organization”, you may have received this message: On May 31 Facebook will automatically switch all nonprofit pages to the new nonprofit page template:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

This has left folks with many, many questions:

  • “What does the new template look like?”
  • “How is it different from what I have now?”
  • “How can I opt out??”
  • “Where can I get more information?!”

The purpose of this guide is to answer all those questions and then some. By the end you will have all the information you need to be ready for the switch at the end of the month.

Previewing the new templates

Any Facebook page admin can preview what the new nonprofit template will look like right now.

To do so first navigate to your Facebook page and click the settings button in the top right corner.

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Then select edit page from the left hand menu:Nonprofit Facebook page templates

On the following page, click the edit button to open the templates menu:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Inside the templates menu you’ll find a view details button on each type of template. Locate the Nonprofit template and select this button:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

You’ll now be able to scroll through a summary of what this new template holds:Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Switching now

Page managers also have the option of switching to the new template now! If you’re interested, just select nonprofits from the list of templates and confirm the switch. Once done, Facebook will ask you if you’d like to start a tour of the new layout:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

This takes you back to your Facebook page and a guided tour:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Further page editing controls

Underneath the option to edit your page template, you’ll find the option to edit the tabs on your Facebook page. Clicking the settings button opens this option and also gives you a direct link to that tab. How cool is that?!

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Under the list of current tabs on your Facebook page you’ll also see the option to add tabs. Just click Add a Tab button:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Once you’re happy with your page’s tabs, you have the power to drag and drop them into any order you’d like:Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Opting out of the nonprofit page template

To opt out of the change, log into Facebook on or after May 31. Navigate to the edit page menu as laid out above. The nonprofit template will be your page’s new template. To switch back, click the edit button:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Scroll until you find Standard and click the View details button:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Scroll to the bottom and click the Apply Template button:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

It will then ask you to confirm. Click okay:

Nonprofit Facebook page templates

Now the new template is applied:

Wrap up While this may feel like a big switch for nonprofits on Facebook, we don’t believe it will be in the long run. It’s important to keep in mind that Facebook is still testing their page templates idea. This could be a new feature that sticks around, or it could quietly leave like other failed tested features on the platform.

It’s also important to remember that very few of your supporters ever visit your Facebook page, let alone spend time there. People engage with your posts in their news feed and use your Facebook page to find your website, addresses, phone number, etc. In short, page templates are a nice improvement but probably won’t make a huge difference to organizations.

automated rules Facebook

Facebook ad rules: Do More Good With Less Work

Don’t have time to check your ads, ad sets, and campaigns on a daily basis? Then you need to try Facebook’s new automated ad rules!

All you have to do is tell Facebook what to check, when to make changes, and what those changes should be… and voila! You have your own automated ad assistant. Or if you’d rather personally make adjustments on the fly, you can also request notifications to keep you in the loop if and when certain things occur.

Either way, Facebook just gave nonprofits like you a ton of new power on their ads platform!

But power is only good if you know how to use it, right? So let’s talk logistics. Here’s exactly how to set it up.

Creating New Ad Rules

To get started, open your Facebook Ads Manager or Power Editor. (In this example, we’ll be using Ads Manager.)

On the first screen, right when you login, you should see a Create Rule button in the middle of the page under the Campaigns tab.

automated rules facebook

Choose which ads you want this rule to apply to. You can choose a particular campaign, ad set, or ad, or you can choose to apply the rule more broadly.

automated rules facebook

Next, choose what action you’d like to happen once the rule is triggered. This can range from sending you a notification to automatically adjusting the budget or bid amount for the ad in question.

automated rules facebook

Now you need to choose the condition under which your action will be triggered. Facebook gives us a ton of options here, so spend some time digging into this menu to discover your options.

automated rules facebook

You’ll also need to choose the time range and attribution window for this rule. The time range is the number of days’ worth of data you’d like the rule to apply to. The attribution window allows you to track actions taken during a particular span of time.

automated rules facebook

Lastly, choose how to receive notifications and name the new rule.

automated rules facebook

And look at that: You’ve created an ad rule!

automated rules facebook

Managing Existing Ad Rules

Rules can then be managed by clicking the down arrow and choosing Manage Rules. You’ll find this right next to the Create Rule button when you login to Ads Manager or Power Editor.

automated rules facebook

From there you’ll be taken to a new screen, where you can turn rules on or off, make changes, or even delete rules.

Automated rules Facebook

Select the Activity tab at the top to see a list of all rules and details about each one. Automated rules Facebook

And that’s all there is to it. So go log into your Facebook ads account and give this new feature a spin. You can also find more info and resources here or email us if you have any questions: info@actionsprout.com

facebook town hall

Facebook Town Hall features now available to nonprofits

Please note: This feature is currently only available to US users of Facebook.

Earlier this year, Facebook quietly released a new feature called Town Hall that they hoped would encourage US users to become more involved in elections.

“The feature is available to all U.S. users on desktop and mobile, and will now include News Feed integration….Facebook also announced it’s launching local election reminders for the first time, to encourage users to vote in state, county, and municipal elections.”

For the most part, this hasn’t been a very visible feature so far. Most users of the site probably didn’t even notice the new “Town Hall” icon in their left hand menu:

facebook town hall

But, that may be about to change. Facebook pages with the category of “non profit organization” now have the option to include a call to action, to contact a representative, in their Facebook posts.

That’s right. Your nonprofit Facebook page can add a Contact button to your posts that points to a representative supporters can start a conversation with.

Let’s look at all the bells and whistles of this exciting new feature, shall we?

Getting started

As the screenshot below shows, nonprofits now have a “Town Hall” icon they can select to add the call to action:

facebook town hall

Start typing a name and Facebook will suggest matching representatives on Facebook:

facebook town hall

Once you’ve selected your representative you’ll have the opportunity to fill out the rest of the post. This is a great place to include your theory of change! State the issue at hand, layout a reasonable solution and give supporters an easy way forward to help make a meaningful difference. Like contacting their local Reps!

facebook town hall

Here’s an example of what the post will look like once published.

A couple of things make this post really unique. First, we see a cute phone icon and “Contacting Senator Maria Cantwell” at the top of the post. Next we can see how many people have already contacted this representative. Lastly we find a call to action button embedded right on the post: facebook town hall

When supporters click the Contact button, they will be shown a screen with some options to do so. Do note: there is an option to start a conversation using Facebook Messenger!

facebook town hall

When a supporter selects the Share button, they are able to create their own call to action post encouraging their friends to reach out to this representative as well.

facebook town hall

Now you’re probably wondering, “But what happens if the person I select isn’t one of my supporters’ representatives?” The answer is, Facebook has your back!

In the example below we’re looking at a call to action to contact a state representative from Texas. Because I don’t live in Texas, Facebook doesn’t give me the contact button like before. Instead that button prompts me to find my Reps.

facebook town hall

Doing so takes me to the Town Hall page inside of Facebook. At the top of the screen Facebook has found 10 of my representatives on Facebook. I have options to follow these people or start a conversation. I’ll also see how many of my Facebook friends have connected with a representative in the past. In this case I have 52 Facebook friends who have.

facebook town hall

Wrap up

It’s not hard to see that this is one of Facebook’s many responses to the 2016 and 2017 elections in the US and European Union. It will be very interesting to see how this succeeds, or not, in getting more people involved in their country’s elections.

More interesting though, will be how nonprofit Facebook pages step up and leverage this powerful feature! Unlike Facebook the company, you and your organization probably have a much closer relationship with your audience of supporters. This puts you in a very unique, and powerful position, to drive and influence behaviors in your supporters. So take your newfound knowledge and go make the world a better place, you nonprofit hero you!

fake profiles

Nonprofits: Stop using “fake” profiles to access a Facebook page

Does your nonprofit uses “fake” or dummy Facebook logins to access your organization’s Facebook page? If so, you’ll need to switch to your team’s real Facebook profiles… TODAY.

Why so urgent?

Facebook is cracking down hard on fake accounts. Following the 2016 US presidential election and subsequent elections across the European Union, Facebook is under increasing pressure to go after anyone using its platform to perpetuate false information.

What’s their plan of attack? Well, first on their list is cracking down on fake profiles. Even though most fake logins aren’t created nefariously, if your nonprofit uses one, you will be caught in this sweep.

As Reuters reports,

“Facebook said it would go after amplifier accounts based on behavioral analysis that shows signs of inauthenticity.”

In other words, if their systems finds any fake profiles, they will shut them down. No questions asked. And if those profiles were your only way to access your nonprofit’s Facebook page? You’re fresh out of luck. Granted, you could try to work with them to regain access, but that often takes weeks or even months. What if you have events, fundraising efforts, or stories to promote in the meantime? Trust us. You don’t want to find yourself in this situation. We’ve seen it happen to way too many nonprofits, and it’s not pretty.

That’s why we created this article. We’re here to walk you through everything you need to know to help protect your nonprofit from losing access to its Facebook page.

Make the time, make the change, and save yourself the headache.

Facebook Pages and Personal Profiles

According to Facebook’s Terms of Service, you’re only suppose to operate a Facebook nonprofit page via a real Facebook profile. A lot of people think they can (or even should) set up a separate personal profile to avoid a presumed public connection with a page, but Facebook specifically does not want you to do that. If you do, it makes it that much harder for them to determine who’s being sketchy and who’s not.

Your one real, personal profile is suppose to be your key to all of your other activity on Facebook. The platform was specifically designed to work this way, with your personal data kept completely safe and separate from any public groups and affiliations you operate. Your profile isn’t publicly tied to those other pages in any way.

As a matter of fact, using real profiles is actually more secure for your organization overall. For instance, let’s look at the six different types of page roles you can assign a teammate:

facebook page roles

As you can see, you can limit access to different portions of your Facebook page depending on how much access that teammate needs. This is especially important for new employees, interns, volunteers, and other helpers..

One of the major problems with fake profiles is that they’re often given full administrative access without regard to these important distinctions. This can quickly become a nightmare if someone leaves the organization, is unhappy for some reason, or would like to otherwise put your Facebook page at risk, from the inside out.

By using your teammates’ real names and assigning them appropriate roles, you can also help keep track of who did what. For example, if something gets deleted that shouldn’t have, and it was done using a fake profile, it’s impossible to know who really performed that activity.

Why put your organization through an internal witch hunt when simply using real profiles could’ve cleared up that confusion in the first place? Again, we’ve heard too many horror stories…

Making the Fix

Fixing this issue will take you less than five minutes. Seriously.

First of all, there is no limit to the number of profiles you can give page access to. That said, only admins on the page may give those permissions to others.

If you’re an admin for the page, simply follow these instructions to start granting access to the appropriate parties:

Click Settings at the top of your Facebook page.

Click Page Roles in the left column.

facebook page roles menu

Type a name or email in the box. a. If the person is your Facebook friend, begin typing their name and select them from the list that appears. b. If the person isn’t your Facebook friend, type the email address associated with their Facebook account.

add a page role

Click Editor to select a role from the dropdown menu.

Click Save and enter your password to confirm.

That’s it!

This teammate will now receive a notification letting them know they have been given permission to access the page. Now, when they log into Facebook using their normal personal profile, they will be able to easily access and navigate to that page, like this:

pages menu

Once you’re finished adding everyone who should have access (with their real personal profiles), make sure to remove any fake profiles that still have access to the page. If you leave those profiles up, they could cause unnecessary risk to your organization. Be safe, not sorry.

And remember, when you need to add someone in the future, use their real profiles and follow the steps above. You can even bookmark this guide to help.

Wrap up

The days of using fake Facebook profiles are quickly coming to an end. While nonprofits often don’t mean any harm by creating them, they are against Facebook’s Terms of Service and how they’ve specifically designed their platform. With the sheer number of pages on Facebook (40-million to be exact!), Facebook simply doesn’t time to sort through which fake profiles are being used for good or ill.

Your best bet is to simply follow the Terms of Service, and it’s too your benefit, too.. Don’t put yourself and your nonprofit at serious risk of losing page access, not mention getting on a Facebook list of people who are truly up to no good.

If you ever have questions or concerns please reach out to us at info@actionsprout.com

Super Bowl 2017 advertisers spark controversy over equal pay and immigration

If you watched the Super Bowl this year, you may have noticed an increase in the number of political and cause-based ads coming from big brands. Now, we’re all familiar with Coca-Cola’s feel-good ads about bringing people together and teaching the world to sing. And you may remember that these ads received some blowback from audiences at the time. For example:

“One simply does NOT sing America the Beautiful in ANY language but English! Get on board or OUT!”

But those ads are nothing compared to the uproar in response to 2017’s Super Bowl ad lineup! If your nonprofit fights for equal pay or immigration and refugee rights, then these are stories that you may want to jump on. “Piggy-backing” on already-trending subjects related to your cause can lead to tons of new reach and support—no ad dollars needed!

  • Try spinning up a petition in support of these issues.
  • Create a “thank-you” campaign that acknowledges big brands for putting profit on the line in favor of important issues.
  • Create a poll asking your supporters how they feel about this year’s ads.
  • Use donation appeals to fight for these issues.

Using an ActionSprout social action, you can create all of the above ideas and more. All actions collect names and email addresses on completion, so you’ll also be increasing your supporter base!

Now, without further ado, let’s dive into the ads!

Audi USA

Cause: Equal pay for women

Hashtag: #driveprogress

Airbnb

Cause: Immigration and refugees

Hashtag: #WeAccept

Budweiser

Cause: Story of founder’s immigration to America from Germany

Hashtag: None

This ad may have caused the strongest reaction on social media. Many called for a boycott of Budweiser, and soon the hashtag was trending on Twitter.

84 Lumber

Cause: Immigration and souther border wall

Hashtag: None

If Budweiser caused the most buzz on Twitter, the 84 Lumber ad probably won overall for the most outrage caused. Before the Super Bowl even started, things weren’t going well for the brand:

“The company said it had been forced to change its plans for a commercial after Fox deemed its depiction of a Spanish-speaking mother and daughter confronting a border wall between the United States and Mexico to be “too controversial.” It aired an edited version without a wall, directing viewers to watch the whole spot on a website, Journey84.com.”

Wrap Up

If your nonprofit fights for equal pay or immigration and refugee rights, then these are stories that you may want to jump on! Most recently, the ALCU has been taking advantage of trending news to raise millions in donations to fight for civil rights and liberties. Your nonprofit could find similar success and increased donations by following their example.

Facebook FAQs

Do YOU know the answers to these top Facebook FAQs?

ActionSprout works with nonprofits of all sizes and causes across the globe. Here are the questions they most frequently asked about Facebook. Chances are they asked some of the same questions you’re dying to know the answer to, too!

Let’s dive in, shall we?

How can I increase the organic reach and engagement of my Facebook Page?

The key to increasing your organic reach and engagement is content curation. This is the practice of finding and sharing the top stories and news related to your mission on your Facebook Page—not just your own content, but also content from others that is getting lots of likes, shares and clicks. The Facebook algorithm promotes content that people engage with, and so by sharing highly engaging content, you will grow your organic reach and engagement. You can learn more about why and how to curate Facebook content here.

What is the difference between reach and engagement?

“Reach” is the number of people that saw your post in their News Feed. (Not all of your supporters see all of your posts—over 1,500 pieces of content are competing for 200–300 News Feed slots for each person each day!) They may have stopped and read your post, interacted with it by liking, sharing, clicking or commenting, or they might have scrolled right past it.

“Engagement” is when a person interacts with your post by liking, reacting, commenting, sharing, clicking or watching a video. It will always be a subset of the people that the post has “reached,” because not everyone chooses to interact with every post they see.

How can I get more people to view my nonprofit’s Facebook Page?

People do not typically visit Facebook Pages. (When was the last time you visited a Page other than your own?) Instead, people will see and engage with your content when it appears in their News Feed. Trying to get people to view your content on your Page instead of in their News Feed is fighting an uphill battle against how they naturally use Facebook. Our advice: don’t worry about your Page too much—focus instead on creating great posts that people want to engage with!

What defines a “fan,” and how exactly does Facebook calculate this?

Your Page fans are anyone who has clicked the “Like Page” button on your Facebook Page, an ad or post. Your current fan count is the number of people who have clicked this button minus those who subsequently unliked your Page by clicking it again.

Can people who haven’t liked my nonprofit’s Facebook Page (non-fans) still see our posts?

Yes! All the posts that you publish to your Facebook Page are public and viewable by anyone, regardless of whether they have liked your Page or not. The number one way that non-fans see your content is when their friends share your posts. They can also sometimes see your posts when their friends like or comment on the post, or if you used a hashtag.

Is there any way to send messages to people who have liked my Page?

Not at this time. Facebook does not allow Page managers to bulk message the people who like their Page. Alternatives include: messaging key people who like your Page individually, engaging them in conversation in the comments, or running social actions to collect the contact information of your supporters on Facebook so that you can send them emails.

How do you build relationships with people who like and comment on your posts?

Message them back, reply to their comments and like their comments on your posts! One of the best ways to build deeper relationships with your supporters on Facebook is to engage in conversation with them! Don’t leave their questions unanswered, thank them for their support, or share additional resources that they would enjoy. Liking their comments on your post shows them that you care. You can learn more about replying to comments and building relationships here.

Should I verify my nonprofit’s Facebook Page?

Yes! There is no reason not to verify your nonprofit’s Facebook Page. Verification signals trust and security to your supporters, and clears up any questions about whether the Facebook Page belongs to your organization. This verification follows your Page all over Facebook as well, including in search and comments. Here’s how to get started.

Why don’t I have a “donate now” button on my nonprofit’s Facebook Page?

To unlock this feature, your Facebook Page must be classified as a nonprofit. Here’s how to check what your current Page category is and how to change it. Once you have categorized your Page as a nonprofit, follow these instructions to set up your new donation button.

I started my nonprofit as a personal profile on Facebook. Should I switch to a Page?

Yes! Personal profiles are designed to represent real individuals and not organizations. Facebook says:

“Personal profiles are for non-commercial use and represent individual people. Pages look similar to personal profiles, but they offer unique tools for businesses, brands and organizations. Pages are managed by people who have personal profiles.”

Using a personal profile for anything else is against Facebook’s terms of use:

“It’s against the Facebook Terms to use your personal account to represent something other than yourself (ex: your business). If you’re using your account to represent something other than yourself, you could permanently lose access to your account if you don’t convert it to a Page.”

Worse, personal profiles are limited to 5,000 friends, which many nonprofits will quickly exceed. Learn how to convert your personal account to a Page.

What makes a “good” post? Should I always include an image? Should my text be a certain length? How about videos? How long should they be? Are text-only posts okay?

There are no fixed rules that define a “good” post. Ultimately, you will need to experiment and pay attention to what works on your own Page with your fans.

Here are a few loose rules of thumb to get you started:

  • Try to post the most engaging image or video that you can. Photos of people and animals tend to be highly engaging, especially if they’re looking right at you.
  • If you’re including a lot of text in your post, make sure that your most important message comes first. Otherwise, people will have to click “read more” to see it and most will miss it.
  • If think you might spend money to boost a post with an image, make sure that the image contains less than 20% text. You can check this with Facebook’s text tool.
  • When creating and uploading videos, make sure that your video grabs people’s attention in the first two seconds. Videos auto-play as they come into view, so you have just a moment to catch someone’s attention enough make them stop scrolling and watch your video. Put the most important part first to grab attention, and then work backward from there once you have it.
  • 80% of Facebook users watch videos with the sound off. This means that your video must have text or captions, or be otherwise be understandable without sound.

How does the Facebook algorithm determine which of your fans receives each post?

There are three main ways that Facebook decides which of your fans they will show your post to.

  • Their relationship with your Page. If they commonly engage with your posts, they are likely to see more of them in their Feed. If they usually don’t engage when they have the chance, they will see fewer of your posts over time, and may stop seeing them altogether.
  • Have they historically shown Facebook that they are interested in the subject matter that you just posted about? If they commonly engage with posts about polar bears, and you posted a polar bear post, they are likely to receive it in their Feed.
  • Have they historically shown Facebook that they prefer the content type that you just posted? If they commonly engage with videos over other types of media, and you posted a video, they are likely to receive it in their Feed.

How often should I post to Facebook?

This will depend on when your particular audience is on Facebook. Facebook gives this data to every page manager under the Insights tab, then Posts.

I am concerned about “communications fatigue” with our audience if we post 2–3 times per day.

First of all, not all your Page fans see each of your posts. Instead, each time you post to Facebook, the algorithm decides which of your fans would most likely enjoy and engage with the post. Thus, if you post multiple times a day, you are reaching a new sub-group of your fans each time. In this way, you are increasing your overall Page reach for that day. It is safe to say that if you posted to Facebook five times in one day, no single fan would see all five posts in their Feed. Facebook is very good at protecting its users against spam like this.

How many posts per day is too many?

That will depend on your particular Page fans, your content and your issue. Many successful Pages post 10 or more times per day! Most nonprofits, however, do not have the time or resources to post that often, and that’s okay. Post as much as you can; it’s extremely unlikely that you will ever post enough to cause a problem.

What’s the difference between a mention and a hashtag?

A mention links to a person or Page. Once mentioned in a post, they will receive a notification on Facebook. Mentions are used to get someone’s attention, invite them to engage with your post, or ask for a response. Anyone who clicks on the mention will be taken to that person’s profile or Page. Learn more about mentions here.

Hashtags are used to organize large conversations on Facebook and social media at large. When someone clicks on a hashtag in a post, they see a feed of all the people and Pages talking about that subject. It’s a way to tell everyone, “I’m joining this conversation and I want this post to be a part of it.” Learn more about hashtags here.

3 Tips for Masterful Facebook Videos (Plus a Little More!)

If you’ve noticed lately, video has become a bigger and bigger feature on Facebook. That’s because video grabs your attention better than images and certainly better than text. Your Facebook videos don’t need to be long and expensive productions; in fact, they often do better when they aren’t.

So what makes a video great? Or shareable? It’s pretty simple really… there are three things you need to do:

1. Inspire Viewers

This is a great place to get your viewers excited about the great work that you do or about the need for the organization/campaign. Video is the greatest way to tell a story and create the emotional involvement needed to engage people in a real way. This is also a great opportunity to give some advice or to challenge people to do what they can in their lives and their communities.

Even better is if you can challenge them through the message itself, like Will Smith does in this short clip. (But you don’t need celebrity status to be successful at it.)

2. Educate Your Audience

People love to learn new things, especially when it’s something fun, interesting and there isn’t a quiz at the end. What matters is that the user is learning something in a simple and relatable way. Surely you’ve seen the recipe videos floating around on Facebook; if not, you should—they are awesome! These videos are a great example of educational content that nonprofits should be creating and posting.

Watch this and think about a few things as we drool over this tasty video. Even though there’s sound in the video, there’s no need for it, as most people don’t listen to the sound because they watch the auto-play on Facebook. It’s quick, easy to follow and entertaining, with great subject matter (and nonprofits have truckloads of great subject matter).

3. Be Entertaining

How-to-Capture-Facebook-Videos-1

First, the first two seconds of the video need to capture the viewer’s attention.

Second, you need to upload it to Facebook, not drop in a link from YouTube. Why? Because of auto-play. A video uploaded to Facebook will auto-play so that the viewer doesn’t need to do anything.

Third, and we can’t stress this enough, tell a story. Stories are the most powerful way to connect with people. Just check out this video from BuzzFeed. They just showed up at an event (probably asked permission first) and started shooting. It tells a story; it’s entertaining and inspiring; and it teaches us a simple lesson: “Don’t stand up your grandpa.”

That’s it. Just keep it simple: inspire your audience, educate them and don’t be boring. Most of all, have fun.

Bonus Tips

Create a playlist

Playlists are an easy way to group videos that have a theme. Viewers will often binge on playlists until they get bored or run out of videos. Once you’ve created a few great videos, string them together with a playlist.

Boost it

Boosting a video is an awesome and often cheap way to make a splash on Facebook. Keep your goals in mind though. Boosting a video is great for awareness, reach and engagement, not conversions. Image posts are better if you want people to click through.

Use 360 video

facebook_videos_360_ios_android_0

Two things we can say for sure. Nearly 90% of all videos on Facebook are viewed on mobile, and fans love being a part of the action. 360 video covers both. It gives the viewer an immersive experience and is strictly for mobile devices. For this one, you’ll need to buy a special camera (they’re as low as $400 and coming down). The uploads are often very easy with little to no processing required. Imagine taking your fans on a walk through the community that you serve, through the forest that you protect, or to visit the animals that you’ve saved. Now that’s awesome.

Watch the data

facebook_Videos_Metrics_(1)

Facebook allows you to see when people stop watching the video. There will always be a drop at the beginning because people are just scrolling by. But pay attention to big drops later in the video. If viewers drop off in the first few seconds, then the video wasn’t catchy enough. If they drop later, they may have gotten bored, gotten the point of the video, or seen the ending to the story and didn’t feel the need to continue. One more reason to learn how to tell great stories.

Get Started Fundraising on Facebook

Now is a really exciting time for fundraising on Facebook! Historically fundraisers and donation appeals fell flat on the platform. Sure some nonprofits found success, but most did not or if they did it was very limited. But now that is all changing!

Over the last year we have seen a remarkable increase in the amount of people who are now comfortable donating on Facebook. This number is rapidly increasing and it’s important for you to understand how to make Facebook fundraising work for your nonprofit.

It’s important to note two things that are critical to this success:

  • First the donation experience has to be mobile optimized, which means people can complete it quickly with only a few taps and that it looks amazing on a small screen.
  • Second it has to be shareable because people are donating inside the Facebook context, they want to be seen supporting your organization.

Since this is one of the most frequently asked questions we receive in our webinars and through our live chat, we thought we would put together a quick guide on how to get started in just a few minutes. This guide will walk you through how to create the most optimized donation page available today plus how to set up your own “donate now” button on Facebook.

Let’s get started!

A few house keeping points before we start

If your nonprofit has a Facebok page you’re going to want to make sure you have your Donate Now button configured correctly so you can provide you donors with the best experience.

To setup your Donate Now button you will need two things an ActionSprout account and a Stripe payment account. If you’re a 501(c)3 we have a special deal from Stripe just for ActionSprout users, you’ll get $15k in donations fee free and then only 2.2% + $0.30 per transaction.

Let’s start with setting up an ActionSprout account.

Step 1: Your ActionSprout account

Log in or Sign up for ActionSprout, then add your nonprofit’s Facebook page.

add your page to as - wrapped

If you have any issues, don’t hesitate to chat with us on the ActionSprout website, or send us an email at info@actionspout.com.

Step 2: Connecting Stripe and ActionSprout

Open your ActionSprout account. Click the Settings tab, then Integrations

add an integration - wrapped

Scroll down to Stripe and click Connect Stripe.

connect stripe - wrapped

Follow the steps on the resulting window to connect your Stripe account with ActionSprout.

If you don’t have an account with Stripe yet, you can create one now.

You’re going to need:

  • Your nonprofit’s legal name
  • TaxID/EIN
  • Bank account and routing numbers

If you have any questions contact Stripe’s customer support.

Step 3: Create your donation appeal

Inside of ActionSprout click on the large Actions tab at the top and then the green Create Action button:

create an action - wrapped

This will open a right hand menu. From this menu select Donate:

From here you will be dropped into the donation action creation screen. Use our best practices guide to help you fill in the basics:

action basics screen - wrapped

Make sure your donation appeal is something you can leave up for a while as your main donation button on Facebook. Otherwise, if it’s too time-sensitive, you’ll need to replace it with a new one often.

Once done, scroll to the bottom to configure your donation buttons:

donation amounts- wrapped

This is what will be displayed to your potential donors:

donation action on phone

Once you’re happy with your donation action hit save.

Step 4: Configure Donate button on Facebook page

The final stretch! We just have to drop this new donation page into the Donate now button at the top of your nonprofit’s Facebook page.

To do so, click the green Share button on your donation action. Inside this sharing menu scroll to the bottom and find the Make this your page’s primary call-to-action button section. Click the set as button and you’re done:

cta in share drawer

Now you can test your button! Log into Facebook and navigate to your page. Click on your new button and choose the test option:

test cta on facebook- wrapped

If all checks out, you’re done! Any donations that come through this button can be accessed through your Stripe account.

Have any questions about raising donations on Facebook? Feel free to reach out! We’re always happy to help.

Facebook faqs

Top 16 Facebook FAQs from the Nonprofit Sector

ActionSprout works with nonprofits of all sizes and causes across the globe. Here are the questions they most frequently asked about Facebook. Chances are they asked some of the same questions you’re dying to know the answer to, too!

Let’s dive in, shall we?

How can I increase the organic reach and engagement of my Facebook Page?

The key to increasing your organic reach and engagement is content curation. This is the practice of finding and sharing the top stories and news related to your mission on your Facebook Page—not just your own content, but also content from others that is getting lots of likes, shares and clicks. The Facebook algorithm promotes content that people engage with, and so by sharing highly engaging content, you will grow your organic reach and engagement. You can learn more about why and how to curate Facebook content here.

What is the difference between reach and engagement?

“Reach” is the number of people that saw your post in their News Feed. (Not all of your supporters see all of your posts—over 1,500 pieces of content are competing for 200–300 News Feed slots for each person each day!) They may have stopped and read your post, interacted with it by liking, sharing, clicking or commenting, or they might have scrolled right past it.

“Engagement” is when a person interacts with your post by liking, reacting, commenting, sharing, clicking or watching a video. It will always be a subset of the people that the post has “reached,” because not everyone chooses to interact with every post they see.

How can I get more people to view my nonprofit’s Facebook Page?

People do not typically visit Facebook Pages. (When was the last time you visited a Page other than your own?) Instead, people will see and engage with your content when it appears in their News Feed. Trying to get people to view your content on your Page instead of in their News Feed is fighting an uphill battle against how they naturally use Facebook. Our advice: don’t worry about your Page too much—focus instead on creating great posts that people want to engage with!

What defines a “fan,” and how exactly does Facebook calculate this?

Your Page fans are anyone who has clicked the “Like Page” button on your Facebook Page, an ad or post. Your current fan count is the number of people who have clicked this button minus those who subsequently unliked your Page by clicking it again.

Can people who haven’t liked my nonprofit’s Facebook Page (non-fans) still see our posts?

Yes! All the posts that you publish to your Facebook Page are public and viewable by anyone, regardless of whether they have liked your Page or not. The number one way that non-fans see your content is when their friends share your posts. They can also sometimes see your posts when their friends like or comment on the post, or if you used a hashtag.

Is there any way to send messages to people who have liked my Page?

Not at this time. Facebook does not allow Page managers to bulk message the people who like their Page. Alternatives include: messaging key people who like your Page individually, engaging them in conversation in the comments, or running social actions to collect the contact information of your supporters on Facebook so that you can send them emails.

How do you build relationships with people who like and comment on your posts?

Message them back, reply to their comments and like their comments on your posts! One of the best ways to build deeper relationships with your supporters on Facebook is to engage in conversation with them! Don’t leave their questions unanswered, thank them for their support, or share additional resources that they would enjoy. Liking their comments on your post shows them that you care. You can learn more about replying to comments and building relationships here.

Should I verify my nonprofit’s Facebook Page?

Yes! There is no reason not to verify your nonprofit’s Facebook Page. Verification signals trust and security to your supporters, and clears up any questions about whether the Facebook Page belongs to your organization. This verification follows your Page all over Facebook as well, including in search and comments. Here’s how to get started.

Why don’t I have a “donate now” button on my nonprofit’s Facebook Page?

To unlock this feature, your Facebook Page must be classified as a nonprofit. Here’s how to check what your current Page category is and how to change it. Once you have categorized your Page as a nonprofit, follow these instructions to set up your new donation button.

I started my nonprofit as a personal profile on Facebook. Should I switch to a Page?

Yes! Personal profiles are designed to represent real individuals and not organizations. Facebook says:

“Personal profiles are for non-commercial use and represent individual people. Pages look similar to personal profiles, but they offer unique tools for businesses, brands and organizations. Pages are managed by people who have personal profiles.”

Using a personal profile for anything else is against Facebook’s terms of use:

“It’s against the Facebook Terms to use your personal account to represent something other than yourself (ex: your business). If you’re using your account to represent something other than yourself, you could permanently lose access to your account if you don’t convert it to a Page.”

Worse, personal profiles are limited to 5,000 friends, which many nonprofits will quickly exceed. Learn how to convert your personal account to a Page.

What makes a “good” post? Should I always include an image? Should my text be a certain length? How about videos? How long should they be? Are text-only posts okay?

There are no fixed rules that define a “good” post. Ultimately, you will need to experiment and pay attention to what works on your own Page with your fans.

Here are a few loose rules of thumb to get you started:

  • Try to post the most engaging image or video that you can. Photos of people and animals tend to be highly engaging, especially if they’re looking right at you.
  • If you’re including a lot of text in your post, make sure that your most important message comes first. Otherwise, people will have to click “read more” to see it and most will miss it.
  • If think you might spend money to boost a post with an image, make sure that the image contains less than 20% text. You can check this with Facebook’s text tool.
  • When creating and uploading videos, make sure that your video grabs people’s attention in the first two seconds. Videos auto-play as they come into view, so you have just a moment to catch someone’s attention enough make them stop scrolling and watch your video. Put the most important part first to grab attention, and then work backward from there once you have it.
  • 80% of Facebook users watch videos with the sound off. This means that your video must have text or captions, or be otherwise be understandable without sound.

How does the Facebook algorithm determine which of your fans receives each post?

There are three main ways that Facebook decides which of your fans they will show your post to.

  • Their relationship with your Page. If they commonly engage with your posts, they are likely to see more of them in their Feed. If they usually don’t engage when they have the chance, they will see fewer of your posts over time, and may stop seeing them altogether.
  • Have they historically shown Facebook that they are interested in the subject matter that you just posted about? If they commonly engage with posts about polar bears, and you posted a polar bear post, they are likely to receive it in their Feed.
  • Have they historically shown Facebook that they prefer the content type that you just posted? If they commonly engage with videos over other types of media, and you posted a video, they are likely to receive it in their Feed.

How often should I post to Facebook?

This will depend on when your particular audience is on Facebook. Facebook gives this data to every page manager under the Insights tab, then Posts.

I am concerned about “communications fatigue” with our audience if we post 2–3 times per day.

First of all, not all your Page fans see each of your posts. Instead, each time you post to Facebook, the algorithm decides which of your fans would most likely enjoy and engage with the post. Thus, if you post multiple times a day, you are reaching a new sub-group of your fans each time. In this way, you are increasing your overall Page reach for that day. It is safe to say that if you posted to Facebook five times in one day, no single fan would see all five posts in their Feed. Facebook is very good at protecting its users against spam like this.

How many posts per day is too many?

That will depend on your particular Page fans, your content and your issue. Many successful Pages post 10 or more times per day! Most nonprofits, however, do not have the time or resources to post that often, and that’s okay. Post as much as you can; it’s extremely unlikely that you will ever post enough to cause a problem.

What’s the difference between a mention and a hashtag?

A mention links to a person or Page. Once mentioned in a post, they will receive a notification on Facebook. Mentions are used to get someone’s attention, invite them to engage with your post, or ask for a response. Anyone who clicks on the mention will be taken to that person’s profile or Page. Learn more about mentions here.

Hashtags are used to organize large conversations on Facebook and social media at large. When someone clicks on a hashtag in a post, they see a feed of all the people and Pages talking about that subject. It’s a way to tell everyone, “I’m joining this conversation and I want this post to be a part of it.” Learn more about hashtags here.

Supporter management

Supporter management on Facebook just got better!

What is the foundation of your Facebook page made of? It’s not a trick question. Your page is made up of people!

The problem with your Facebook page can also be people. They’re a bit of a double edged sword! You want to grow your following on Facebook, but once you do so, it can be easy to become overwhelmed.

Who are my supporters on Facebook these days? I’ve completely lost track! It’s hard to keep up with the comments and messages and know who I’m talking to. Who are my donors? Who are my volunteers? Who are my most active supporters?

Don’t feel bad! This happens to all Facebook pages as they grow. That’s why at ActionSprout, we’ve been hard at work on features and tools that make managing and knowing who your supporters are a bit easier.

Supporter Tagging

Tag anyone in your ActionSprout account with unique, custom tags. This tag follows the supporter throughout ActionSprout and your data exports. Now, no matter where you view the supporter, you’ll have an idea about who they are based on their tag(s).

You’ll always know if a person interacting with your page needs a follow up, further engagement, or possibly needs to be blocked (in the case of online trolls).

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Why would you use People Tags? The reasons are almost unlimited. Here are just a few ideas about who to tag to get you started:

  • Your donors
  • Your volunteers
  • Any known trolls or troublemakers
  • Your employees
  • Known influencers
  • Active Facebook fans
  • MVPs
  • Celebrities for your cause

Engagement Level

We know what you’re probably thinking: “Supporter tags are awesome…but what if I don’t know who they are to tag them in the first place? Then what?”

The answer: Engagement level.

Everyone in your ActionSprout account is given an Engagement Level score based on their interactions with your page on Facebook. Based on these scores, you’ll be able to tease out who your MVPs are, who needs further engagement and who’s almost there.

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The higher the score the more passionate and connected to your cause they are.

Engagement Scores are a weighted sum of your supporters likes, comments, actions completed and donations given. The weights are as follows:

  • Likes X 1
  • Comments X 5
  • Actions completed X 20
  • Donation amount given X 5

Thus someone who likes a lot of your posts may still have a lower score than someone who has donated to or taken action for your cause.

While not bulletproof, this score will give you a pretty good idea of who your supporters might be.

Existing supporter profiles

These two new pieces of information are added to the existing supporter profiles already inside your ActionSprout account. As you know, these profiles continue to grow in richness as your supporters continue to engage with you on Facebook.

Like we said at the top, your people are the core and foundation of your mission. At ActionSprout, we’ll always be working to give you the best possible tools to make reaching, engaging and growing your relationship with these people the best experience it can be.