Facebook posting

Why your nonprofit needs a daily Facebook posting goal

Do you have a daily Facebook posting goal? If not, you should. Keeping a daily posting goal is one of the easiest ways to maintain consistent levels of organic reach and engagement on your Facebook page. It can also keep your supporters engaged with you and receiving your content in their news feeds!

Still, coming up with ideas for what to post can be difficult. Here, we’ll cover the best ways to keep a daily posting goal that can help you to maintain a healthy Facebook page and to accomplish your larger organizational goals.

Posting inconsistently can cause dramatic spikes and drops in your organic reach and engagement.

One of the things we hear the most often from nonprofits is the desire to maintain a consistent level of organic reach and engagement on Facebook. Many are tired of the extreme spikes and drops in their metrics and wish Facebook could be normalized when it comes to the reach and engagement earned each time they post. At the moment, it can feel like the roll of the dice which is the last thing anyone wants before posting a large, important campaign post!

To make matters worse, organic reach has been dropping for many Facebook page managers. Not only do they desire consistent reach and engagement, they want it to increase!

The good news is that keeping a daily posting goal can help normalize and improve the organic reach and engagement you earn on Facebook. Posting the same number of times each day (including on the weekends) gives you the same number of opportunities to earn organic reach and engagement each day. This helps to smooth out the spikes and drops experienced when posting inconsistently or missing days all together.

Consistent posting each day can also increase your organic reach and engagement over time as you’re giving your supporters more opportunities to see and engage with your content. The truth is that if you post on Facebook but your supporters are not online to see it, they likely will miss your post and will never get the chance to engage with it. Facebook moves so quickly that it’s likely to get buried – even more so if the last time you posted to your Facebook page was a number of days ago!

Therefore, posting consistently a few times a day opens up the number of opportunities you’ve given your supporters to engage with your cause. This, in turn, can increase and normalize your organic reach and engagement.

Posting inconsistently can decrease your number of active, engaged supporters.

Not only can we increase and maintain our organic reach and engagement by posting consistently, we can also retain our most active, engaged supporters on Facebook. Building on the first point we covered, you can begin to lose active supporters on Facebook if you don’t give them enough opportunities to see your content and engage with it.

With the way the Facebook algorithm currently works, a supporter who hasn’t engaged with your page’s content in some time will slowly stop receiving your posts all together. Why is this the case? Facebook uses a number of behavioral triggers to decide which of your supporters receives which of your posts in their news feed. One of the behavioral triggers is post engagement. If they haven’t engaged with your page in a long time, Facebook takes this as a sign that they are no longer interested in your page and it’s content.

The problem is, posting inconsistently can falsely cause this to happen. Your supporters aren’t necessarily any less interested in your cause, they just haven’t received any of your content because the few times a week your page posted, they missed it.

Therefore, posting consistently a few times a day increases the likelihood of your supporters receiving at least one of your posts and engaging with it. This keeps them engaged each day and receiving your content on their news feed.

Posting consistently can increase the success of your top campaigns!

Too many organizations make the mistake of only posting when they have a campaign to share on Facebook. The problem is, as we saw above, this leaves too much time for your supporters to become disengaged and stop receiving your posts, especially if a number of days or weeks has gone by without a single new post on your Facebook page!

The way Facebook currently works, it’s really important to keep posting consistently and keeping people engaged in between your larger campaigns. Doing this ensures that there are still engaged supporters left when you share your donation appeal or petition asking for signatures.

There is also a second principle at play here. Supporters who follow you on Facebook expect to receive valuable content in their news feeds. That’s the number one reason they are following you! If you fail to give them this assumed value, they may not be very forth coming when you ask for help with your next campaign. Think about it, if an organization only asked you for help or money while never giving you any value in return, you’d start to feel less positive about that organization.

We call the mix of this content “The Cheese and Broccoli Rule.” While kids don’t want to eat broccoli by itself, if you add cheese, they start to like it a lot more. Similarly, if you’re not posting fun content of value, in other words, the cheese, your supporters are much less likely to take the broccoli, which is your important campaigns.

Wrap up

As you can see, posting consistently each day on Facebook can have a huge impact on the health and success of your Facebook page overall. Simply setting a daily posting goal can ensure that your supporters are engaged and ready when you have an important campaign to share. It can also retain and further grow your relationships with already engaged, passionate supporters in your cause.

While you don’t need any special tools to set a daily posting goal, ActionSprout does include a built in daily goal tracker. This can be an easy way to stay on top of your goal if your organization has an ActionSprout account.

How your nonprofit can leverage viral reach for good on Facebook

These days, we hear a lot about “going viral” online. Our friends send us “viral” cat videos that everyone is watching. It feels like we see the same “viral” memes and videos every time we open our phones. Invariably, we feel pressure to make something viral to promote our own nonprofit.

What is virility anyway? How does one “go viral” or become a viral hit? Is it even possible to control?

This article will define what viral reach means on Facebook and how you might leverage it to introduce more people to your organization and cause.

Defining Viral Reach

The definition of viral reach on Facebook is actually pretty straightforward. Viral reach is anytime someone who isn’t a fan of your Facebook page sees one of your posts. This means they have not liked your Facebook page yet, may not have heard of your organization before and may not even know about your cause.

That’s it. Pretty simply right?

How do people outside my page fans see my posts?

A common misconception is that only your Facebook page fans can see your posts. This is simply not true. When you post to Facebook, anyone has the chance to see that post. Your page fans will be the first people to see your post, but once it’s out in the wild on Facebook it has the potential to go far beyond just your page fans.

The proof of this is shown by one of our fun, demo pages “Cats oh my”. This page had 3,738 fans at the time of this writing:

viral reach

To date, 18,036 people have engaged with the content we publish to this page.

viral reach

This means almost 20,000 people have reacted to, commented on, or shared one of our “Cats of my” posts even though we have less than 4,000 page fans! So how are they finding our content in their personal news feeds if they don’t like our page?

According to Facebook:

“It’s possible to see posts from people and Pages you aren’t connected with if a friend or Page that you are connected with engages with that post. For example, if you’re friends with Joan Smith you could see a story in your News Feed that says “Joan Smith liked this post from Mercy Corps”, even if you have not liked the Mercy Corps Page. When you create posts that people engage with, your content will reach more people who have liked your Page and their friends.”

That means if your core group of Facebook page fans are highly engaged with your content, it’s likely to spread to their friends and family as well. Now if their friends and family also engage with the content it could spread to their friends and family as well. And so on and so on. Are you beginning to see how your content has the potential to ripple out across Facebook in a powerful way?

Can I influence this in my favor?

Viral reach clearly has some serious power behind it to further our cause and organization on Facebook! The question is, can we control it and leverage it to our advantage? The answer is yes and no.

First of all, anyone who tells you they know the secret to viral reach or can promise you viral reach is, one: trying to take advantage of you, or two: very misguided themselves. In short, there is no magic bullet for viral reach. You cannot “make” something or viral or set out to create a “viral video”. It simply isn’t that easy or straightforward. There is a lot of luck, randomness and chance that goes into something taking off and “becoming viral”.

But with that being said, you do have some influence over the reach of your content. Again, according to Facebook:

“A key tactic to reach a desired audience is to create content that they want to see and be seen sharing. You should think strategically about how to post content that is relevant to that audience, that they might like, share, comment on, or generally enjoy reading. To do this, it helps to understand the characteristics of your desired audience and the type of content they typically engage with.”

If you can figure out what types of posts your Facebook page fans are most likely to go bananas over and share themselves, you can increase the likelihood of viral reach.

Don’t worry, if you’re not sure what types of content will inspire your page fans to engage with and share your content, there are ways to figure it out:

“If you don’t know what people in your community want, find out by testing a variety of posts. You don’t need to have a perfect posting strategy from the beginning. Try posting regularly while intentionally changing the post length, type, tone and topic. After a couple weeks, go back and look at the Post Insights to see which posts are being engaged with. The goal is to hone in on the type of content and calls to action that are resonating with your supporters.”

There are also tools to help you along the way! You can learn what your audience likes through your Facebook Page Insights or your ActionSprout Timeline.

Key takeaways

It is possible to reach a large number of people outside your core Facebook fanbase. When you reach a number of these “non-page fans” it’s called viral reach or “going viral”. You do have some influence over this and can increase your likelihood of viral reach by sharing content you think your page fans will love and want to share with their own networks of friends and family.

post on Facebook

Why you should post 2 to 3 times a day on Facebook

In the broadest sense, your nonprofit maintains a Facebook page in order to engage people in your cause. The execution and nitty gritty will be different, but how you get there will be the same: by posting engaging content on your Facebook page.

Posting engaging content is your number one job on Facebook and your primary means for reaching and engaging your current supporters, along with new, potential supporters. So how do you “post well” on Facebook and reach your goals?

There are two laws to follow when posting on Facebook:

  1. Post when your supporters are most likely to be on Facebook
  2. Post at least two to three times a day

This article will walk you through law #2. We’ll discuss:

  1. Why two to three posts a day is the optimal number to reach and engage as many supporters as possible
  2. Why you don’t have to worry about overwhelming or spamming your supporters with too many posts
  3. How you can create and find all this content

Why your goal should be 2 to 3 posts a day

To understand why we should be posting so often, we need some context on the Facebook environment. According to Facebook there are:

“More than 1.6 billion people [who] use Facebook to connect to the things they care about…On average, there are more than a billion stories posted to Facebook every day.”

That is a lot of people and posts!

What the folks at Facebook quickly learned was that showing every user every possible post, from the friends, family and the pages they followed, was out of the question. If they did so, every user would have to scroll through roughly 1,500 posts per day to find the posts and stories they really cared about. Thus, Facebook developed a powerful algorithm to decide which of these 1,500 possible posts each user receives in their news feed, and which are the most important to put at the top.

That means each time you post to Facebook, roughly 5% of your page fans, on average, will receive the post in their news feed. Based on their past behavior and browsing patterns, Facebook has decided these particular 5% are the folks most likely to enjoy and engage with the content you just published. In short, Facebook matches the right people with the right posts.

Now this brings us back to posting two to three times a day! Because such a small percentage of people receive each of your posts, it’s extremely unlikely that one single person will see all of the content you publish in a day, because the algorithm is matching up the right people with the right posts.

Thus, each time you post, that post is reaching and potentially engaging a new 5% of your supporter base that will be more likely to enjoy your post. This means that by simply posting two to three times a day you can increase your reach and engagement without paying for it through Facebook advertising.

Who doesn’t want that!

It’s really hard to spam your supporters on Facebook

Think about it, Facebook is more afraid of spamming their users than you are. Without its users, Facebook has nothing! Because of this, your goals and Facebook’s goals are aligned: engage people with awesome content and make them want to come back for more!

We already touched on this fact before: it’s extremely unlikely that one unique person will see all the content you publish in the course of a day. If they do see several of your posts, it means they have engaged with your content so often that Facebook has decided to show them more of it. This is a good thing, and definitely not spammy behavior on your part! They’re asking Facebook for more of your content through their actions!

But how does Facebook know who to deliver your posts to, and how often?

“The three main types of signals used to estimate a post’s relevance to each person are:

  1. WHO POSTED IT – The friends, family, news sources, businesses and public figures a person interacts with most are prioritized in their News Feed.
  2. POST TYPE – Whether it’s photos, videos, or links, News Feed prioritizes the types of posts that a person interacts with most frequently.
  3. POST ACTIVITY – Posts that have a lot of likes, comments and shares (especially from the people a person interacts with most) could appear higher in a person’s feed.”

By following these rules, Facebook does a really good job figuring out which users to show which posts. And, to reverse that, Facebook is really good at not delivering content to users who won’t enjoy it. Therefore your supporters rarely receive a post from you that they won’t like or might feel is spammy:

“The goal of News Feed is to show people the stories that matter to them most — by showing people the most relevant stories to them higher up in their feeds, we hope to create the best, personalized experience for everyone using Facebook. We do this by taking into account thousands of signals and ranking stories from most to least relevant for each person. Every time someone refreshes their feed, News Feed ranks all the stories they are eligible to see and delivers them in this order to their feed.”

That opens you up to post more often, take more risks with posting, and try new things. If a post doesn’t “work”, very few people will receive it, and you can fail gracefully.

Remember, no one visits your Facebook page but you and your team!

How you can create and find this much content

Let’s quickly recap before we go any further. First, we now know that posting the optimal two to three times a day means we can increase the number of supporters we reach and engage on Facebook without spending any money on Facebook ads.

Second, posting frequently does not mean spamming your supporters. Facebook is really good at figuring out which posts to show to which users in order to make them happy and willing to spend more time on Facebook. And more time on Facebook means more time consuming your content!

So how do we come up with two to three posts everyday to publish on Facebook? Two words: Content Curation. 80% of the time, you will share images, videos and news created by others that relates to your cause. The last 20% of the time, you’ll create your own original content in house.

If this is setting off plagiarism warning bells inside your head, you’re not alone. Here’s why sharing other’s content on Facebook is not only encouraged, but built into the core design of the platform.

There are many ways to find and choose the content you’ll share from others. You can use Facebook’s Interest Lists feature, ActionSprout’s Inspiration feature, Google Alerts and many more!

When in doubt, repost your own high performing content a second or third time to your page! According to Facebook:

“It is not bad to periodically re-post your top performing content. If you find that a topic or image gets a lot of engagement, try re-posting it. Because News Feed curates what each person sees in order to serve them the most relevant and interesting content, it is very hard to “spam” the people who have liked your Page.”

How you find this content doesn’t matter as much as the fact that you’re posting two to three times a day, when your supporters are most likely to on Facebook. That’s it. If you follow these two laws of posting you’ll be much more likely to reach your organizational goals on Facebook.

Happy posting!

when to post on facebook

Everyone who tells you when to post on Facebook is wrong

There is no shortage of people telling you about the best time(s) to post on Facebook. However, these “best times to post” articles, written by “certified Facebook experts,” are all based on broad averages and studies. They are guesses at best, and do not reflect the reality of your supporters’ Facebook habits:

when to post on facebook updated

The truth is that the real answer of when to post has been available to you the entire time—through your Facebook Page.

Facebook itself will tell you when your supporters are on the site. And who would post based on a general average when you could have the cold, hard facts about your own supporters? The problem is that so few Page managers know that this data is given to them or where to find it. Instead, they trust the averages and the self-proclaimed experts, not knowing that a better solution is right in front of them.

This ends today. This post will show you where to find this data through your Facebook Page and how to use it.

Where to Find the Data

To find out when your supporters are on Facebook, login and navigate to your nonprofit’s Page.

At the top of your Page, you’ll find the Insights tab. Click on it:

when to post on facebook

From here, you will click on Posts from the left-hand menu. This will open up the graph that we want to look at:

when to post on facebook

This graph is a seven-day look at when your Page fans will most likely be on Facebook (it learns from their past behavior). This graph is pretty accurate because:

  1. People typically login to Facebook at the same times every day, i.e. during their lunch break or after work.
  2. Facebook has a ton of past behavioral data to pull from. The larger the sample size, the higher the accuracy.

How to Read the Data

By Day

Just above the graph, you’ll find a series of bars—one for each day of the week. This tells you, on average, how many of your Page fans log in to Facebook each day. In this example, Saturday wins by just a hair. If you have an important post or campaign coming up, this can help you to decide which day(s) is/are the best to make the announcement.

By Hour

The graph then shows you, on average, what hour(s) your Page fans are on Facebook for the week as a whole. Hovering over a day bar just above will display the particular times for that day. In this example, if you hover over the Friday bar, you can see a unique spike at 7am:

when to post on facebook

This would be one of the best times to post on Friday each week. We can also see that 1pm, 3pm and 6pm are also uniquely good times to post on Friday on Facebook.

We can do the same for each day. Here’s Thursday; on Thursdays in particular, we should post at 8am, 9am and 5pm:

when to post on facebook

This can be a bit tedious at first, but once you have the hang of it, and a sense of when your Page fans are on Facebook each day, it will pay huge dividends over trusting the general averages that you can find on Google.

An Automated Option

There is an option, through ActionSprout, to automate this process. If you share any post from the ActionSprout app, we will show you the next best time to post on Facebook based on your Page graph:

when to post on facebook

You also have the option to browse these times for the coming week. Simply click on the Optimal posting times link right below the default next best time:

when to post on facebook

This allows you some flexibility but makes sure that you’re always posting at optimal times.

Wrap-Up

You have some options for choosing how to take advantage of this powerful data based on your preferences. What’s important is that you use your own personalized data instead of generic averages to guide your decisions on Facebook.

Want to learn even more about the data tucked away inside your Page’s Insights tab? Here are the top three metrics to know about. Spoiler: you already know the first one!

organic reach

400% increase in organic reach after one week of content curation

If you’re not already practicing content curation on your nonprofit’s Facebook Page, you absolutely should be! Content curation is the practice of finding and sharing high-performing content from other Pages. This practice allows you to post more often and increases your Page’s reach and engagement. This case study shows the effects it had on Northshore Veterinary Hospital’s Facebook Page after just a week of practice. (If you’d like to dig into the strategy of content curation further, this article is for you.)

Northshore Veterinary Hospital’s Facebook Page

Brita Kiffney is one of the lovely veterinarians at Northshore, and is responsible for managing their Facebook Page. We had the pleasure of sitting down with her one day and diving into their Facebook Page and strategy.

When we first spoke to her, she was posting as little as one post or fewer per day. When she had the time to upload an original picture of one of her patients, she would do so. If she didn’t have time that day, she wouldn’t. But even with how little she posted to their Page, they still enjoyed solid engagement from their fans. This told us that Northshore’s Page had a ton of untapped potential waiting to be unlocked.

Screen Shot 2016-05-16 at 3.17.46 PM

Learning to Curate

After meeting with us, Brita decided to give ActionSprout, and a content curation strategy, a try. Here we’ll walk you through the steps that she took to get her ActionSprout account and new strategy off the ground.

Following Pages

First, Brita had to follow the right pages through ActionSprout. Fine-tuning who she followed was the key to the rest of the strategy working. After all, these are the sources whose posts she should be sharing on Northshore’s own Facebook Page! Ensuring that they posted content that was on topic and tone, compared to their own Page, was really important.

Brita landed on the following mix of Pages:

  • Fellow veterinarians that she respected
  • Local and national humane societies
  • Pet publications
  • Fun Pages that posted cute pet videos and images

This mix of followed Pages gave her an awesome sampling of fun and serious material to post to Northshore’s Page. (We call this the broccoli and cheese strategy.)

Using the Inspiration tool inside her ActionSprout account, following these Pages was as simple as typing in names and keywords:

organic reach

Once followed, Brita was even able to add custom tags to the Pages. She tagged the fun Pages as such, the fellow vets, and so on. Now if she was short on serious material one day, she could sort by those tags and only surface the content options that applied.

Scheduling the Content

Once she had her followed Pages, she figured that it was time to start scheduling! Finding the right content to post to her Facebook Page was as easy as browsing through her new Inspiration feed, and sorting and filtering as needed:

Screen Shot 2016-06-02 at 12.26.20 PM

When she found something that she liked, she simply clicked the share button on that piece of content. This opened up the sharing menu, where she could schedule the post for the next time when most of her fans and supporters were on Facebook:

Screen Shot 2016-06-02 at 12.33.31 PM

How did the tool know when her fans and supporters were on Facebook? Facebook gives this data to all Facebook Page managers. When connecting your Facebook Page to ActionSprout, ActionSprout is able to look at this data and pull out the best times for you.

The Day to Day

With everything in place, Brita was able to pop in and out of the app as needed. On busy weeks, she could come in on Monday and schedule three to four posts for each day of the week. When she had the extra time, she would pop in once every day or so and schedule things as they came up.

And, as always, when she had cute pictures of her patients, she published them.

The Results

We were blown away by the results after just a few days! Through the use of ActionSprout and her new content curation efforts, Brita was able to increase her posting frequency to a consistent four to five posts a day! The ActionSprout app allowed Brita to schedule posts for the entire week so that, as she got busy, her posting stayed consistent. Consistent posting is key to consistent reach and engagement on Facebook.

The results are astounding! The highlighted day on the graph, April 28th, was when Brita added an additional four posts a day of curated content to their Facebook Page. As we can see, her organic reach sharply goes up from there. All in all, she enjoyed a 400% increase in organic reach on their Page:

Screen Shot 2016-06-02 at 3.21.35 PM

She also noticed a change in engagement on their Page. The number of likes, comments and shares on their posts noticeably increased.

Conclusion

Content curation can feel uncomfortable for many nonprofits when starting out. It feels counterintuitive at best, and like stealing at worst. What we have to keep in mind is that Facebook is not a traditional communications channel.

Facebook and social media in general are social spaces where ideas, content and stories are freely shared among users. Sharing is hardwired into Facebook; proper attribution is automatically included and the sharing of worthy content is expected.

Most of all, the results speak for themselves! So, what are you waiting for? Start your own content curation strategy today and start seeing the same success as Brita at Northshore Veterinary Hospital.

The Top Posts for Education Associations to Share: May 16, 2016

The secret to increasing the reach, engagement and growth of your page is Content Curation.

Sharing trending, high-performing, posts from others in your sector is one of the most important things you can do on Facebook to be successful. The top pages on Facebook practice this strategy, with most following the 80/20 rule – 80% of their page’s content is shared from others and 20% is original content.

Curating content is not only normal, it’s expected throughout social media. The following posts were pulled using ActionSprout’s Inspiration feed which makes this strategy fast and easy to practice.

Here are the top-performing posts that educational associations should be sharing.










We can’t express the importance of sharing great content enough! Facebook is built for sharing and telling stories. ActionSprout makes it fast and easy to find the best content to share in your space.

Try the inspiration tool for yourself. It has never been easier to leverage the Facebook Algorithm for your mission.

The Top Posts for YMCA Pages to Share: May 9, 2016

The secret to increasing the reach, engagement and growth of your page is Content Curation.

Sharing trending, high-performing, posts from others in your sector is one of the most important things you can do on Facebook to be successful. The top pages on Facebook practice this strategy, with most following the 80/20 rule – 80% of their page’s content is shared from others and 20% is original content.

Curating content is not only normal, it’s expected throughout social media. The following posts were pulled using ActionSprout’s Inspiration feed which makes this strategy fast and easy to practice.

Here are the top-performing posts that animal shelters should be sharing.










We can’t express the importance of sharing great content enough! Facebook is built for sharing and telling stories. ActionSprout makes it fast and easy to find the best content to share in your space.

Try the inspiration tool for yourself. It has never been easier to leverage the Facebook Algorithm for your mission.

Cutest Posts for Animal Shelter Pages to Share: May 5, 2016

The secret to increasing the reach, engagement and growth of your page is Content Curation.

Sharing trending, high-performing, posts from others in your sector is one of the most important things you can do on Facebook to be successful. The top pages on Facebook practice this strategy, with most following the 80/20 rule – 80% of their page’s content is shared from others and 20% is original content.

Curating content is not only normal, it’s expected throughout social media. The following posts were pulled using ActionSprout’s Inspiration feed which makes this strategy fast and easy to practice.

Here are the top-performing posts that animal shelters should be sharing.










We can’t express the importance of sharing great content enough! Facebook is built for sharing and telling stories. ActionSprout makes it fast and easy to find the best content to share in your space.

Try the inspiration tool for yourself. It has never been easier to leverage the Facebook Algorithm for your mission.

Top Posts for environmental pages to Share: May 2, 2016

The secret to increasing the reach, engagement and growth of your page is Content Curation.

Sharing trending, high-performing, posts from others in your sector is one of the most important things you can do on Facebook to be successful. The top pages on Facebook practice this strategy, with most following the 80/20 rule – 80% of their page’s content is shared from others and 20% is original content.

Curating content is not only normal, it’s expected throughout social media. The following posts were pulled using ActionSprout’s Inspiration feed which makes this strategy fast and easy to practice.

Here are the top-performing posts that art museums should be sharing.










We can’t express the importance of sharing great content enough! Facebook is built for sharing and telling stories. ActionSprout makes it fast and easy to find the best content to share in your space.

Try the inspiration tool for yourself. It has never been easier to leverage the Facebook Algorithm for your mission.

drafting posts

4 reasons why drafting posts creates stronger team workflows

You now have the power to save posts as drafts (inside the drafts folder of Facebook) through the ActionSprout app. While this feature may seem small, the implications are huge.

Here are four big reasons why you should get excited about drafts!

drafting posts

Reviewal process

Many organizations require that posts first get approved before they are published to Facebook. The Facebook drafts folder is the best overall setting for the reviewal process to take place.

In this folder, see exactly how the post will appear once published. Review all messaging, imagery and layout in it’s final form. This is the most accurate preview of a post you can get!

Now when you’re creating a post or action from within ActionSprout take advantage of this powerful reviewal feature.

Delegation

The drafts feature offers easy delegation and sharing of work. Lighten your workload and let an intern or fellow staff member draft up some posts. When it’s time to post, you can review their work and publish / schedule the content from within the drafts folder. If the content still isn’t quite right, edit the post right there. If the post is totally off the mark, you can simply delete it.

Now you can share the work without giving up control or quality.

Collaboration

Similar to the above, the drafts feature makes team collaboration easier. Select the content you’d like to post from Inspiration or Timeline, layout your message and save your finished idea as a draft. Now your team can jump into the drafts folder and give your content a look. As stated above, this is the most accurate representation of the post once it is published. This makes getting a second pair of eyes or a sanity check easy.

More control over how you work and post

This feature simply gives you even greater control over how you work inside of ActionSprout. Whatever your personal workflow looks like, you now have the full power of posting through the ActionSprout app. From planning, drafting, scheduling and publishing, we hope you and your team feel empowered and productive through ActionSprout.

Now go try the feature for yourself and see what you think!